We can power all of Maryland with clean energy

Too much of our energy comes from coal, oil and other dirty sources that wreak havoc on our environment.

We are surrounded by clean energy options here in Maryland — the power of the sun and the wind, the heat of the earth, and even the energy leaking from drafty windows. By using energy more efficiently and tapping our vast renewable energy resources, we can move to 100% clean energy that doesn’t pollute and never runs out.

The area off our coast, just 12 miles out from Ocean City, has the potential to be one of the most productive areas for harnessing wind power in America.

We have the momentum

With the backing of Environment Maryland staff, members, and supporters, along with the Offshore Wind Coalition, Maryland passed historic legislation last year to harness offshore wind off the cost of Ocean City.  With this momentum behind him, Governor O’Malley released a strong climate change plan to further strengthen our renewable energy standards.

These were major steps in the right direction, but we still have a long way to go.  Environment Maryland helped pass historic clean energy laws in 2004 and 2008, and our work continues.  Our current standards mandate that 20% of Maryland’s energy comes from renewable sources by 2025.  Working with the Maryland Climate Coalition’s Cleaner Power--Brighter Maryland campaign, we have the opportunity to double that goal and reach 40% renewable energy by 2020. 

We face powerful opposition from some utilities and the fossil fuel industry, who'd like to keep us dependent on dirty energy sources, such as coal. They’ve built their business around the dirty, dangerous fuels of the past, and they’re reluctant to change. That's why we need to build and demonstrate the support for clean energy from Marylanders like you.

Clean energy works for Maryland

Three years ago, Environment Maryland helped build the Offshore Wind Coalition, a diverse group of environmental, labor, faith, business, and other community groups, and successfully pushed for the passage of a new law in 2013, that guarantees the construction of an offshore wind farm 10 miles or more off the coast of Ocean City.  Thanks to the hard work of our members, allies and supporters, Maryland is poised to become a national leader in wind power.

Now we're working with the Maryland Climate Coalition to get cities, businesses, and Marylanders committed to a 40% clean energy goal, and ensure citizens across the state can reap the benefits of clean, local energy.

 

 


Clean energy updates

News Release | Environment America

Environment America and EnergySage announce partnership to help more Americans adopt solar power

In an effort to help more Americans research and adopt solar energy for their homes and businesses, Environment America and EnergySage announced a new partnership today. Environment America will encourage its members and the general public to use the EnergySage platform to find the right solar installation option in their area.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment Texas

Federal Court: Exxon Violated Clean Air Act Over 16,000 Times, Must Pay $19.95 Million Penalty

HOUSTON – A federal district court has ruled on a lawsuit brought against ExxonMobil in 2010 by Environment Maryland's sister organization Environment Texas and Sierra Club. They, with the help of National Environmental Law Center, sued Exxon for violating the Clean Air Act more than 16,000 times at its Baytown, Texas, refinery and chemical plant.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

This isn’t your normal Earth Day. Make it your most impactful. | Ross Sherman

Ideas for action during a challenging time for our environment.

 

 

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

Cities can lead the solar energy revolution | Bret Fanshaw

Without federal clean energy leadership, local governments will need to pick up the slack.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment Maryland Research and Policy Center

Solar in Baltimore continues to grow

Solar in Baltimore grew 57% from 2015 to 2016, according to new research released today by Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center.

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed